Eamonn Butler

Author and broadcaster on economics and social issues

Eamonn the Writer

Eamonn is a highly experienced writer, and has authored articles, reports, monographs and books on a wide range of subjects – not just economics and finance, but politics, psychology and social affairs too. For some years in the 1980s he edited an insurance magazine in the City of London, and he has also edited a number of books with multiple authors.

His books include easy-to-read basic primers on important economists such as Adam Smith (author of the 1776 classic, The Wealth of Nations), Nobel laureates Milton Friedman and F A Hayek, and the leading Austrian School thinker Ludwig von Mises. He has also written a short, popular introduction to how markets work, called, appropriately if immodestly, The Best Book on the Market.

Eamonn is also co-author (with Robert S Schuettinger) of the much-acclaimed Forty Centuries of Wage and Price Controls), which, he says, traces the history of politicians’ economic incompetence back to the age of Hammurabi of Babylon. With his colleague Dr Madsen Pirie (former Secretary of the high-IQ society Mensa), he is also co-author of three books on intelligence testing, including The Sherlock Holmes IQ Book.

His other popular books include The Rotten State of Britain (2009) and what he calls a twelve-step plan to cure the UK of its fiscal alcoholism, The Alternative Manifesto (2010).

Because of his ability to explain complex economic and social issues in simple, engaging and provocative terms, Eamonn is often asked to contribute articles in both specialist journals and popular newspapers. He has written for Financial WorldPrivate BankingEconomic Affairs and other specialist journals. Among his newspaper credits are The Times and The Sunday TimesThe Daily TelegraphThe Sunday TelegraphThe GuardianThe Wall Street JournalThe Mail and The Mail on Sunday. But his favourite, he says, is Scotland’s Sunday Post, “because I’ve followed the Oor Wullie cartoon since I was six.”

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